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Stress and Depression Increase Risk of Death in Heart Disease Patients

Stress and Depression Increase Risk of Death in Heart Disease Patients

Stress and depression increase risk of death in heart disease patients by 48% according to new research. Researchers suggest that stress and depression together created a “perfect storm” for patients with coronary heart disease.

Coronary heart disease is a disease in which plaque builds up in the coronary arteries. Over time, the arteries could become narrowed and restrict blood flow to the heart. When blood to your heart is reduced or blocked, angina or heart attack can occur.

While previous studies have examined how stress and depression separately impact health negatively, this six-year study looked at patients with coronary heart disease who experienced both stress and depression together.

Patients with coronary heart disease were visited at home and questioned about stress and depression in their lives.  Around 6% of the patients in the study reported both high levels of stress and depression.

Though there was no increased risk of heart attack or death if patients experienced either stress or depression separately, if you have coronary heart disease it’s imperative to reduce your stress and manage your depression. Talk to a health care professional to get the help you need.

A Positive Attitude is Beneficial for Heart Patients

A Positive Attitude is Beneficial for Heart Patients

A Positive Attitude is Beneficial for Heart Patients

We all have heard about the benefits of a positive attitude, but new research shows that having a positive attitude helps patients who suffer a heart attack or unstable angina. Optimistic people are more likely to heed their doctor’s advice when it comes to lifestyle changes to protect their heart – and their health. They were more likely to eliminate unhealthy behaviors like smoking and poor eating.

85% of optimistic patients had stopped smoking within a year, while half of the patients in the pessimistic group were still smoking, the study found. Similarly, 40% of the optimists were consuming five or more portions of fruit and vegetables a day, compared to 20% of the pessimistic patients.

This study shows the impact a positive attitude can have on your heart health.

Work with your doctor on incorporating healthier lifestyle habits into your daily routine. Stopping smoking, eating healthier, and losing weight are great places to start.

In addition to your doctor, you’ll find resources to quit smoking on the American Lung Association website.

For ideas on what to include in a heart-healthy diet, download our free eBook “8 Heart-Healthy Recipes That Taste Great Too”.

Dr. Brian Nelson Appeared on “Real Milwaukee” for American Heart Month

Brian Nelson MD

In recognition of American Heart Month, Dr. Brian Nelson appeared on the Fox 6 show, “Real Milwaukee.” Click to watch Dr. Nelson’s appearance.

Dr. Nelson quizzed the hosts on heart health and expanded on the correct answer. He talked about aspects of a heart-healthy lifestyle and proper diet.

Here are the questions from the show. How would you answer?

True or False. Breast cancer is the leading cause of death for women in the United States.

True or False. Heart disease is entirely heredity.

True or False. Drinking alcohol every day, but not a lot, is good for my heart.

Click the link above to watch Dr. Nelson’s appearance and find out the answers.

Dr. Nelson is a heart and vascular expert with over 22 years of experience as a cardiologist in the Milwaukee area. He is board certified in Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology.

Lori Emmert from All Good Healthy Fast Food prepared Quinoa and Vegetables, the recipe they donated for our eBook “8 Heart-Healthy Recipes That Taste Great Too.”

What 4 Presidents Can Teach Us About Heart Disease

4 Presidents and Heart Disease

The President of the United States has often been called the most powerful person in the world, but that doesn’t make them immune to heart disease. Heart disease can affect everyone, no matter who they are.

We can learn a lot by examining four of our Presidents who suffered from cardiovascular disease. We need to be mindful of our health and take the necessary steps to maintain good health.

Here’s what 4 Presidents can teach us about heart disease:

Grover Cleveland was the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. He served from 1885-1889 and 1893-1897. Cleveland suffered throughout his life with obesity and died of a heart attack at the age of 71 in 1908.

William Taft served as President from 1909-1913. He is known for being our most obese President. He stood 5’11” and weighed close to 340 lbs at the end of his Presidency. A year after leaving office he lost 80 lbs by eating a proper diet. His blood pressure dropped considerably because of his weight loss. Many experts also say this extended his life. He later went on to serve in the Supreme Court from 1921-1930. Taft died of cardiovascular disease in 1930 at the age of 72.

Dwight D. Eisenhower was a decorated World War II hero and Supreme Commander of the Allied Forces. He began smoking two to three packs of cigarettes a day while at West Point, which he continued to do until poor health affected him as President. He was also a regular drinker. Eisenhower served as President from 1953-1961. From 1955 until his death in 1969 he suffered seven heart attacks and a stroke.

Bill Clinton served as President from 1993-2001. He suffered from obesity and in 2004 had quadruple bypass surgery.  In 2010 he complained of chest pains and had two coronary stents placed in his heart. He has since adopted a vegan diet to maintain a healthy weight.

Here are the lessons we can take away from these 4 Presidents to reduce our risk of heart disease:

  • Eat a healthy diet
  • Get plenty of physical activity
  • Stop smoking
  • Reduce alcohol consumption

We can use the example from past Presidents as a reminder, that heart disease can affect everybody. By taking measures to change our habits, we can impact our health and reduce our risks for heart disease.

Dr. Brian Nelson to Appear on “Real Milwaukee” February 26th

Brian Nelson MD

In recognition of American Heart Month, Dr. Brian Nelson, cardiologist at the Waukesha Heart Institute, will appear on the Fox 6 morning show, “Real Milwaukee” on Thursday February 26th. “Real Milwaukee” airs from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Monday through Friday.

On the show, Dr. Nelson will quiz the hosts on heart heart, discuss aspects of a heart-healthy lifestyle and diet, and talk about our eBook, “8 Heart-Healthy Recipes That Taste Great Too.”

All Good Healthy Fast Food will be preparing their recipe, Quinoa and Vegetables, from the eBook on the show as well.

Dr. Nelson is a heart and vascular expert with over 22 years of experience as a cardiologist in the Milwaukee area. He is board certified in Cardiology and Interventional Cardiology.

“Real Milwaukee” has been keeping it real on Fox 6 since 2010. Click to find out more about the show.

Don’t forget to tune in February 26th at 9:00 a.m. to catch the heart-healthy segment with Dr. Nelson.

 

Download your FREE eBook on Heart-Health!

8 Heart Healthy Recipes cover

Download your FREE eBook on Heart-Health!

Want to eat healthier but not sure where to start? Use this eBook as your guide. In it you’ll find heart-healthy tips and recipes that will have you showing off your inner Julia Child in the kitchen!

8 Heart-Healthy Recipes That Taste Great Too is 32 pages jammed packed with great information to help you live heart-healthy!

This eBook will help you:

  • Learn five ways to protect your heart
  • Examine what makes up a heart-healthy diet
  • Learn how to make eight heart-healthy meals

The following Waukesha and Milwaukee-area restaurants have generously donated a great tasting, heart-healthy recipe:

Café Corazon
All Good Healthy Fast Food
Harvest Café
Parkside 23
The Clarke Hotel
Zin – Uncommon California Italian
Generations at 5 Points
Lazy Susan, MKE

We created this eBook to celebrate American Heart Month, but we hope you find the information and recipes in it useful year-round. Download the eBook and start cooking (and eating) your way to better heart-health today!

 

A Happy Childhood Leads to Adult Heart Health

A Happy Childhood Leads to Adult Heart Health

A happy childhood leads to adult heart health says a new study that was conducted in Finland over the last few decades. A recent article in Medical News Today explored the findings which showed children that grew up with positive psychosocial factors, such as a family that practiced health habits, is financially stable, and provides an emotionally stable environment had better cardiovascular health as adults.

The results showed that children that grew up in households with the most positive psychosocial factors had a:

  • 14 percent greater chance of being at normal weight as an adult;
  • 12 percent greater chance of being a non-smoker as an adult; and
  • 11 percent greater chance to have a healthy glucose level as an adult.

The results of this study highlight the fact that the path to heart health starts early and that the benefits are long lasting. The choices that parents make early can have an impact on their children’s health for years to come.